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日本語訳を! 4-(4)

お願いします。  If the students' minds began to wander, the teacher would remind them with words like these in the Satire of the Trades, "I would have you love writing more than your mother and have you recognize its beauty." If the students continued to misbehave,the teacher might warn them about other professions like the "coppersmith at his toil at the mouth of his furnace his fingers like crocodile skin his stench worse than fish eggs." Or the gardener who carried a pole across his shoulders "and there is a great blister on his neck, oozing puss." Maybe then, practicing hieroglyphs wouldn't seem so bad. The students might even agree with the teacher that "it is greater than any profession, there is none like it on earth."  Once the scribes' schooling was done it was time to become an apprentice and to learn even more about the craft by serving a working scribe. We know from an inscription on a statue that a scribe named Bekenkhons spent 11 years as an apprentice in the royal stables after going to school for 4 years at the temple of Mut at Karnbk. There were plenty of job opportunities for scribes. Everything from personal letters to military secrets to magic spells was written by the scribes. Scribes calculated how many bricks it would take to build a wall, and how many loaves of bread it would take to feed the bricklayers. Scribes wrote out healing directions for doctors. They recorded births and deaths. Anything anyone wanted or needed written down required a scribe.  Over time, the slow-to-write hieroglyphs were replaced by an easier system of writing. Scribes still used the sacred way of writing on temples and tombs, but for everyday writing they used a shorthand they called sesh, which means "writing for documents." Later, the Greeks named this writing hieretic.

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 学生の心が、乱れ始めると、先生は、仕事の風刺の中にある次のような言葉で彼らに注意したものでした。「私は、あなたには、あなたのお母さんより書くことが好きになってもらいたい、あなたにその美しさを認めさせたい。」 学生が無作法なことをし続けるならば、先生は彼らに、たとえば、「銅職人は、炉の口で辛い仕事を行い、指は、ワ二の革の様になり、悪臭は、魚の卵よりもひどいのです」と言った様な、他の職業について警告するかもしれません。あるいは、肩に棒を担いだ庭師は、「彼の首には、ひどい水膨れがあり、膿みがにじみ出している。」 多分そうすれば、ヒエログリフを練習することは、それほど悪いようには思えないでしょう。 「それはどんな職業よりも素晴らしいです、それと同じような職業は、何もこの世にありません」と、学生は先生に同意さえするかもしれません。  一旦、書記の学校での教育がすむと、見習いになって、仕事をする書記を手伝うことによって、その技能についてさらに多くを学ぶ時期でした。 我々は、ある像に書かれた銘から、ベケンコーンズという名の書記が、カルンブクのムートと言う寺院にある学校に4年間通った後、国王の厩舎の見習いとして、11年を過ごしたということが、わかります。書記にとって、仕事を得る機会はたくさんありました。 個人の手紙から軍事機密、さらには、魔法の呪文まで、あらゆるものが、書記によって書かれました。 書記は、壁を建設するにはどれくらいのレンガが必要か、そして、れんが工に食事させるには、何個のパンが必要か計算しました。 書記は、医者のために治療手引きを書きました。 彼らは、出生と死を記録しました。 書き留められることを誰かが、望んだり必要とすれば、どんなことでも、書記を必要としました。  時を経て、書くのに時間のかかるヒエログリフは、より簡単な書記体系にとってかわられました。 書記は、寺院や墓には神聖な書記法をまだ使用しました、しかし、日常的な文書のために、彼らは、セシュと呼ばれる速記法を使用しました。セシュとは、「文書のための文字」と言う意味です。 後に、ギリシア人は、この文字をヒエラティックと名付けました。

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