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Naturally,these societies differ from one another in many ways, reflecting difference in their histories, in the social and biophysical environments to which they must adapt today , and in their precise level of technological advance. these societies have,for decades,been struggling with problems that constantly threaten to overwhelm them.

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有り体に言ってこれらの地域社会は、様々な要素において著しい差異を示している。 それぞれの歩んできた歴史にそれは伺え、更に彼らが今日適応すべき社会的、 生物物理的な環境に見て取れる。あるいは技術革新における精緻な水準の違いにも表れていよう。 この地域は過去数十年に亘り、絶えず侵略の脅威と闘い抜いて来たという歴史を持つ。

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    言うまでもなく、このような社会は、いろいろな点で異なっている、歴史も違えば、今日適用される社会的乃至生物理的な環境も異なる、また技術的な進歩の正確な度合いも異なっている。

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