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英文和訳です

Flying cars are even more prevalent in The Jetsons, a 1962 animated TV series about a “typical family” of the twenty-first century. Bubble-topped machines, apparently jet-powered and computer-controlled, have completely replaced the family station wagon (and, apparently, all other forms of ground transportation). The Jetson family’s car is capable of supersonic speeds and rock-steady hovering, and it folds itself into a briefcase when not in use. Typically, for stories about the future, it is ordinary to its users and astonishing to twentieth-century audiences. Blade Runner(1982) is nominally set in in the first decade of the twenty-first century, but its nightmarish vision of a more distant future. Residents are unfazed, therefore, when flying cars swoop overhead and a flying police cruiser descends vertically into their midst. お願いします^^;

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空飛ぶ車は、21世紀の「典型的家族」についての1962年のアニメのテレビ・シリーズ、「ジェットサンズ」で、さらに流行します。 見たところジェット推進で、コンピュータ制御のような、てっぺんに泡の付いた機械が、家族のステーション・ワゴン(そして、どうも、他のあらゆる形態の地上輸送)に完全にとって代わりました。 ジェットサン一家の車は、超音速飛行と完全に静止したホバリングができます、そして、それは使用しないときには、折りたたんで書類カバンになります。 典型的に、未来についての物語であるために、それは使う人には普通で、20世紀の視聴者には驚くべきものです。 ブレード・ランナー(1982年)は、名目上21世紀の最初の10年間に設定されていますが、より遠い将来のその悪夢のような展望を持っています。 したがって、空飛ぶ車が頭上で急降下し、空飛ぶパトカーが住民の中に垂直に下りても、住民は平然としています。

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