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日本語訳を!!c7-6

お願いします!!続き When did you begin to go on digs?While I was in college.But I started late.Some of my colleagues started when they were kids by going to day programs where you'd volunteer for a day and do some digging. Did you decide to go to South Asia because that's where your professors were working?No.Not at all.I had to work really hard to get over there.I knew I wanted to work nn ancient cities,but there are lots of places where I could that.I'm erom southern California,kind of he ddge nf the desert,and it's what I was used to,so I wanted to work some place arid,where you aren't tortured to death by bugs.I also wanted to go somewhere the snakes stay on the ground instead of dropping on you.My undergraduate professors at Rice University worked in West Africa,where there is completely fascinating archaeology,but way too many too diseases. What did you do at Harappa?I looked for kiln sites,to see where in the city people were manufacturing pottery,copper,faience,and other things.I did what's called a total walkover.That means I walked over the entire surface of the site at onemeter intervals with a very good assistant looking for a special type of debris characteristic of these crafts.You get melted bits of pottery,or pieces of crucible [small pots used for melting metal] with a little bit of metal left on it.We found that they were manufacturing in lots of different parts of the city.There wasn't a special quarter,like an industrial park.

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  • sayshe
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いつ、あなたは、発掘を始めたのですか?私が大学にいた頃です。しかし、始めるのが遅れました。私の同僚の何人かは、一日志願して、いくらかの発掘をするデイ・プログラムに行くことによって、彼らが子供のころに始めました。あなたは南アジアに行くことに決めたのは、そこがあなたの教授が働いていたところだったからですか?いいえ。全くそうではありません。私は、そこに行くには、本当に一生懸命に働かなければなりませんでした。私は古代都市に取り組みたいということがわかっていましたが、私がそうすることができそうな場所はたくさんあります。私は南カリフォルニアの砂漠の端の方の出身です、それで、砂漠は、私が慣れていたものですから、私はどこか乾燥した、死ぬほど虫に苦しまないところで働きたいと思いました。私は、また、どこか、蛇が上から落ちてこないで、地面にいるところに行きたいと思っていました。ライス大学の私の学部時代の教授が、西アフリカで仕事をしていました、そこに本当に魅力的な考古学がありますが、病気があまりにも多すぎるのです。 あなたは、ハラッパで何をしましたか?人々が都市のどこで陶器類、銅、ファイアンス陶器、その他のものを製造していたか調べるために、私は窯の跡を探しました。私は、いわゆる、シラミつぶしの踏査を行いました。つまり、この製品に特徴的な特別な種類の破片を探してくれる非常に良いアシスタントと共に、私は、1メートル間隔で遺跡の表面全体を歩いて横断したと言うことです。融けた陶器の一部や、るつぼ[金属を溶かすために使われる小さな器]の破片が、それにわずかの金属を付けて得られるのです。我々は、彼らが都市の様々の異なる場所で製造していたことがわかりました。工業団地のような特別な地区はありませんでした。

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