• ベストアンサー
  • すぐに回答を!

和訳をお願いします

Many years have passed. Although my Japanese is still far from perfect, I became a professional at domo-ing. I found it to be a very happy expression. Not long ago I was packing my bags to go back home for a vacation. Suddenly there was a knock at the door. My friend James was standing there. He had been in Japan for only one month and was planning to stay another two years. He was carrying a box with him. "Could you please give this little present to my girlfriend when you arrive?' He said 'little " but to me the box looked very big. I took a quick look at my bags. They were really full and very heavy. It was impassible to make anything else fit in. However, I felt kind of rude saying no. Without even thinking almost it, my face changed into an expression of worry. I said, "Sore wa doomo..." James looked at me very surprised and asked, "Why are you thanking me? This is not a present for you." I was too tired to explain anything, so I gave him a copy of this article.

noname#133355
noname#133355

共感・応援の気持ちを伝えよう!

  • 回答数2
  • 閲覧数67
  • ありがとう数0

質問者が選んだベストアンサー

  • ベストアンサー
  • 回答No.2

こんな感じではないでしょうか。 流れが分かりやすいように、意訳してあります。 長い年月が経った。 日本語はさほど上達していないが、 「どうも」にかけては 私はすっかりプロになった。 「どうも」は実にハッピーな言葉だと思う。 そんなに前のことでもないのだが、 あるとき私は、休暇で帰省するために荷造りをしていた。 すると突然ノックの音がして、 ドアを開けると、友人のジェームスが立っていた。 彼はほんの1ヶ月前に日本に来たばかりで、 あと2年間滞在する予定である。 彼はなにやら箱をかかえており、私にこう言った。 「向こうに着いたら、僕のガールフレンドに  この小さなプレゼントを渡してもらえないだろうか?」 小さな・・・とジェームスは言うが、 私から見ると、かなりの大きさである。 私はすばやく旅行鞄に目をやったが、 とにかくぎゅーぎゅーに詰め込んであるし、 ものすごく重いのだ。 これ以上何かを入れるなんて無理 ・・・なのだが、断るのも悪いような気がする。 と、いうようなことを考えるうちに、 私はみるみる不安気な表情になっていった。 そして、私は口を開いた。 「んー・・それは・・どうも・・・」 するとジェームスは驚いた表情を浮かべて私を見た。 「どうも?どうしてお礼を?  これは君へのプレゼントじゃないんだけど。」 私はあまりにも疲れており、 説明をするのが面倒でしょうがなかった。 だから代わりに、この記事のコピーを彼に渡した、 というわけだ。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

その他の回答 (1)

  • 回答No.1

何年が経過しました。 私の日本語はまだ全く完全ではありませんが、私はdomo-ingで専門家になりました。 私は、それが非常に満足な表現であることがわかりました。 つい先頃、私は、休暇に家に行くために荷物をまとめていました。 突然、ノックがドアにありました。 私の友人ジェームズはそこに立っていました。 彼は、ほんの1カ月日本にいて、もう2年間滞在するのを計画していました。 彼は彼と共に箱を運びました。 「彼は、'あなたが到着するとき、少ししか、この私のガールフレンドにとって存在しているのに与えてくれませんか?'と'小さい」言いましたが、私にとって、箱は非常に大きく見えました。' 私はバッグをチラッと見ました。 彼らは、本当に完全であって、非常に重かったです。 他の何かをうまくはめ込ませるのは、無感覚でした。 しかしながら、いいえと言いながら、私はちょっと失礼であると感じました。 私の顔は、考えないwithoutのときに心配顔に変化しました。 「痛いwa doomo」と、私は言いました… ジェームズは、非常に驚いているとして私を見て、「あなたはなぜ私に感謝していますか?」と尋ねました。 「これはあなたへのプレゼントではありません。」 何も説明できないくらい疲れていたので、私はこの記事のコピーを彼に与えました。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

関連するQ&A

  • 和訳をお願いします

    3 One of the people from the dormitory broke my tennis racket. He could not speak English very well so he said something like. "Domo, racket no good." He seemed to be very sorry. But he was saying domo― thank you. I got kind of angry! You can imagine. I lend him my racket, he breaks it and comes back saying, Thank you." Very surprising! Anyway, the following day he bought me a new one. The other day I was outside the dormitory waiting for Yoshitaka to pick me up. He was quite late, in fact more than 30 minutes late. Aren't the Japanese usually on time? Perhaps my friend was different. At last he turned up. "Domo, domo. Did you wait long?" He came at me waving his right hand. "These Japanese are really fanny people," I told myself. "He is Late and comes saying, Thank you, thank you.'" I was getting very confused. In this country do you have to say thank you for everything you do? I had already been in the country for four months and I still could not speak Japanese. But I wanted to sound as polite as possible. Therefore, I began to speak very strange sounding English. Here are some examples' 'Thank you, I was late." 'Thank you, he seems to be quite crazy." 'Thank you, this rain doesn't seem to stop." 'Thank you, excuse me." 'Thank you, I thought I saw Mr. Tanaka, but it was another person." "Thank you, he doesn't seem to understand." 'Thank you, it has been a long time since we met." 'Thank you, thank you." Everybody seemed to be very pleased when talking to me. "You am getting to be very Japanese," they used to tell me while uniting. Well, I thought, the English might sound strange to me. However, it, is very close to the way people speak here. So I kept talking l.hat way for quite a while.

  • 和訳をお願いします。

                             【1】  At last l was in Japan. l stepped out of the plane into the Narita Airport building for the first time. l was walking towards immigration when 1 saw it. It was the first time in my life. Two Japanese were standing in front of each other bowing, bowing, and bowing. They seemed to bow for even There was something else though - something very shocking. They were saying many things, but I could not understand. For the first time, l was in a country where I could not even guess a single word of the local language. To me, whatever those two people were saying to each other, it just sounded like noise. However, I could pick up one of the sounds very clearly. It was DOMO.  On the way out of the airport, I could hear again and again that same domo l had to find out what it was. Walking right beside me was a French businessman on his second two-day trip to Japan. He looked like an expert on things Japanese. “Well” he said, “my experience has taught me that it means something like thank you." Then he went on explaining:. "Whenever you want to thank anyone for anything and be polite at the same tune. just say ‘domo and it will be all right. And don*t forget. You have to bow every time you say thank you.* On hearing that I said to myself‘Oh, this is a very useful expression. I must remember it”

  • 和訳お願いします

    和訳をお願いします He had found it lying in the street,and as he looked at me over the top of his glasses,he said,“Maybe now you'll learn not to be careless and lose things.” I 'm a grown woman now,and I still lose things. I'm still careless. But what my father taught me that day was not a lesson of responsibility. I learned not to believe his laughter.Because even his laughter hurt.

  • 和訳お願いします

    和訳お願いします I flew downstairs and turned around as if on a stage,posing and smiling,modeling my new coat for my father who was paying attention to me and telling me how pretty I looked. then he said he wanted me to model the hat,too. “No,Daddy,I just want to show you the coat. Just look at the coat on me!” I said,still swimming around the hallway and trying to avoid the subject of the missing hat. I knew the hat was history. He was giggling,and I thought I was cute and loved because he was laughing and playing with me. We went around a couple times about the hat,and in the middle of his laugh,he slapped me. He slapped me hard on the face, and I didn't understand why. At the sharp sound of his hand on my face,my mother shouted,“Mike! What are you doing! What are you doing ! ”She was breathless and surprised. His anger pierced both my mother and me. I just stood there holding my hand to my burning cheek,crying. And then he took my new hat out of his coat pocket.

  • 和訳して下さい!!

    英語が得意な方 和訳して頂けますか?! お手数お掛けしますがお願いかさます。 a friend at work was very upset with me last Friday He misunderstand me But now he won’t talk to me, it makes me feel bad. was only misunderstanding Then you were upset with me yesterday.. Maybe it’s my fault. I need to be more responsible.

  • 和訳をお願いします

    次の文章は、ボクシング選手のコメントです。 『 I was 240 [pounds], for the last fight. Two weeks later I was already 255 [pounds] because of what it took me to be 240 [pounds], if you look at my body fat percentage, I dieted down. 』 上記の文章の、 『what it took me to be 240 [pounds]』 の訳がわかりません。 よろしくお願いします。

  • 和訳をお願いします。

    海外の友人が英語について教えてくれているのですが、何と書いてくれているのでしょう? **When you start a sentence with "so," it's like it connects it to the previous sentence. For example. The man was hungry. So, he decided to go buy a burrito. In this case it's like it's filling in for "because of this." "Let me see what I can do," and "I translated my message into Japanese" don't seem to connect in quite the same way. If you wanted to use "so", you could say- I'd like to help you as well. So, I'll translate my message into Japanese. Another way you could think of it is if the two sentences COULD connect naturally with only a comma you can use "so." You can write- I'd like to help you as well, so I will translate my message into Japanese. You can't write- Let me see what I can do, so I will translate my message into Japanese. Hope this helps, let me know if I'm writing too many notes here!

  • 和訳をお願いします

    When I arrived at the dormitory, a professor from the university was waiting for me. I wanted to make a good impression So I bowed and said something like "blah blah blah domo blah blah domo domo domo" I took great care to say the domo very clearly. The rest was in a very small and impossible-to-understand voice. Just the sounds. Notice that I said the last domo three times. I wanted to sound very polite. In English it would sound very strange saying thank you, thank you, thank you, so many times, but in Japanese it did not sound bad at all. Anyway, I didn't know what I was saying. The professor looked at me and smiled, "Oh! You speak Japanese very well." I was very happy. Only a few hours in the country and I was already learning the rules of Japanese politeness. Later the same day I met another professor. I bowed and again the same unrecognizable sounds and the dear domes. It worked well. This professor, too, smiled and congratulated me on the perfect Japanese I could speak. The French businessman was right. A bow and a domo, and everybody is happy.

  • 和訳をお願いします

    和訳をお願いします One day my father came home from work and called me downstairs from my room. He bent down to my size and hugged me,and asked me if I would try on my new coat and hat and model them for him. Upstairs I ran,two steps at a time,( 1 )to put on a fashion show for my father. I threw on the coat,but I couldn't find the hat. I nervously looked under my bed and it the closet,but it was nowhere. Maybe he wouldn't notice that I wasn't wearing it.

  • 和訳お願いします。

    As their dinner goes on, my father tells of his plans for the future, and mother shows with expressive face how interested she is, and how impressed. My father becomes exultant, lifted up by the waltz that is being played, and his own future begins to intoxicate him. My father tells my mother that he is going to expand his business, for there is a great deal of money to be made. He wants to settle down. After all, he is twenty-nine, he has lived by himself since his thirteenth year, he is making more and more money, and he is envious of his friends when he visits them in the security of their homes, surrounded, it seems, by the calm domestic pleasures, and by delightful children, and then as the waltz reaches the moment when the dancers all swing madly,then, then with awful daring, then he asks my mother to marry him, although awlnvardly enough and puzzled as to how he had arrived at the question, and she, to make the whole business worse, begins to cry, and my father looks nervously about, not knowing at all what to do now, and my mother says, "It's all I've wanted from the first moment I saw you," sobbing, and he fin& all of this very difficult, scarcely to his taste, scarcely as he thought it would be, on his long walks over Brooklyn Bridge in the revery of a fine cigar, and it was then, at that point, that I stood up in the theatre and shouted: "Don't do it! It's not too late to change your minds, both of you. Nothing good will come of it, only remorse, hatred, scandal, and two children whose characters are monstrous." The whole audience turned to look at me, annoyed, the usher came hurrying down the aisle flashing his searchlight, and the old lad next to me tugged me down into my seat, saying: "Be quiet. You'll be put ou4 and you paid thirty-five cents'to come in." And so I shut my eyes becausex could not bear to see what was happening. I sat there quietly.